Latest travel advice for Morocco including safety and security, entry requirements, travel warnings and health.
Costs

Costs for Moroccan food, accommodations and traveling around Morocco are a lot low by European or North American standards. In Morocco if you stay in the cheapest hotels (or camping out), eat local Moroccan food, and share expenses and rooms with another people, Euros 145/245 each a week would be enough to survive on. On Euros 280/480 each you could live pretty well and in good places, while with Euros700–1000/1000–1400 a week between two persons you would be approaching luxury.

Health

For minor health complaints during your holiday in Morocco, a visit to a Doctor or pharmacy is likely to be sufficient. Moroccan pharmacists are very well trained and dispense a wide range of drugs, including many available only on prescription in the West. If the pharmacists feel you need a full diagnosis, they can also recommend a doctor. You can get addresses of English or/and French-speaking doctors from consulates and large hotels. If you need help or hospital treatment, you can contact your consulate and follow its advice. But if you are near a major city, reasonable treatment can be available locally. State hospitals are usually ok for minor injuries, but for anything very serious, a private doctor and clinic are generally preferable.

Credit Cards & ATM

In Morocco credit or debit cards on the Mastercard, Visa, Cirrus, and Plus networks can be used to withdraw cash from ATMs at many banks around Morocco, except the ones outside post offices. Otherwise, banks may advance cash against Mastercard or Visa. By using ATMs, you will get trade exchange rates, which are better than those charged by banks for changing cash, but your card issuer may add a transaction fee, sometimes hefty. The daily limit on ATM cash withdrawals usually is 3000dh.

Accommodations

In Morocco an accommodation at the lower end of the market is very accessible. Most of the cheap city accommodations tend to have very small doorways and steep, narrow staircases, and often no elevator, though many will have ground-floor rooms. Moroccan beach hotels are more able to cater for the visitors with mobility difficulties. Some package hotels, make an attempt to cater for wheelchair users, but no accessible toilets. It is at the top end of the market, however, that real changes are made: new luxury hotels usually have rooms specifically adapted for wheelchairs and people who have difficulties. Obviously, these need to be booked in advance, and this also confines you to expensive places.